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A UGA student participates in UGA Extension's inaugural Great Georgia Pollinator Census on Aug. 23, 2019. CAES News
A UGA student participates in UGA Extension's inaugural Great Georgia Pollinator Census on Aug. 23, 2019.
Pollinator Census 2020
Students and families are encouraged to participate in the second annual Great Georgia Pollinator Census on August 21-22 coordinated by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
The R. Harold Harrison Distinguished Professorship was established through the generosity of the Luther and Susie Harrison Foundation to strengthen the CAES Department of Poultry Science. Immunologist Rami Dalloul is the first faculty member to hold the newly established professorship. (contributed photo) CAES News
The R. Harold Harrison Distinguished Professorship was established through the generosity of the Luther and Susie Harrison Foundation to strengthen the CAES Department of Poultry Science. Immunologist Rami Dalloul is the first faculty member to hold the newly established professorship. (contributed photo)
Distinguished Professorship
Poultry immunologist Rami Dalloul has been named the R. Harold Harrison Distinguished Professor in Poultry Science at the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES).
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
COVID-19 causing complex problems in the poultry industry
While many were watching the price of poultry, workers in processing plants began testing positive for COVID-19, causing temporary shutdowns at more than 30 meat processing facilities across the nation, according to MEAT+POULTRY’s website, which has been mapping the cases. Together, that caused a complex problem for the poultry industry and for consumers.
The $6.5 million in funding that USPOULTRY has provided to the UGA Department of Poultry Science supports both life-changing academic programs and world-changing research. CAES News
The $6.5 million in funding that USPOULTRY has provided to the UGA Department of Poultry Science supports both life-changing academic programs and world-changing research.
Poultry Research
During this season of gratitude, the faculty and students in the University of Georgia Department of Poultry Science are thankful for the partnerships that have helped make UGA's poultry science program one of the best of its kind in the nation.
Cottonseed is not only more readily available to Georgia farmers, it is also less expensive. Pictured is cotton seed and cotton cake. CAES News
Cottonseed is not only more readily available to Georgia farmers, it is also less expensive. Pictured is cotton seed and cotton cake.
Cotton Cake
John Bernard, a professor and dairy scientist at the University of Georgia Tifton campus, has found that a type of cottonseed meal is an effective protein supplement for dairy cattle.
UGA President Jere W. Morehead and Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black talk with Lee Cromley at Cromley Farms in Brooklet, Georgia. CAES News
UGA President Jere W. Morehead and Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black talk with Lee Cromley at Cromley Farms in Brooklet, Georgia.
Farm Tour
University of Georgia President Jere W. Morehead and Agriculture Commissioner of Georgia Gary Black were part of an annual farm tour that visited southeast Georgia on Wednesday, Oct. 2 to learn about the diverse makeup of the state’s agricultural industry.
The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits. CAES News
The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits.
Cooking Chicken Safely
Food safety experts have been warning consumers against washing and rinsing raw poultry for many years, citing how the bacteria in poultry juices can spread and cross contaminate other foods, utensils and surfaces. A USDA report shows that many aren't listening.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
Poultry Workshops
The poultry industry has a huge impact on the economy in Georgia, and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists are committed to helping the commercial poultry industry stay up to date on the most current problems and trends.
When cows are exposed to a temperature-humidity index above 68, their milk production begins to decrease. UGA animal and dairy scientists are searching for ways to ease heat stress and improve dairy productivity. CAES News
When cows are exposed to a temperature-humidity index above 68, their milk production begins to decrease. UGA animal and dairy scientists are searching for ways to ease heat stress and improve dairy productivity.
Heat Stress Research
Georgia’s summer heat can make it hard to do almost anything outside and, for dairy cows, that includes producing milk. Heat stress is inevitable in the Southeast U.S., and the first week of August had temperatures soaring past 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
Teachers break down a broiler to help learn about the anatomy of a chicken at the UGA Department of Poultry Science’s Avian Academy teacher training. CAES News
Teachers break down a broiler to help learn about the anatomy of a chicken at the UGA Department of Poultry Science’s Avian Academy teacher training.
Avian Academy
Chickens are a vital part of Georgia’s economy and the state’s agricultural heritage. And thanks to a University of Georgia program for teachers, chickens will be helping middle school and high school teachers educate students in Georgia classrooms.