Horses

The University of Georgia’s Equine Extension Program encompasses both state youth horse programs as well as continuing education for horse owners and county Extension agents.  The mission of this program is to provide resources and support for youth education, county trainings and programming, and to serve as a knowledge base for questions and concerns of the industry.

Equine resources from UGA Extension


Equine Researcher

Kylee Jo Duberstein Associate Professor
Animal & Dairy Science

Extension Equine Specialist

KARI K. TURNER Associate Professor
Animal & Dairy Science

Equine Public Service Assistant

Julia S. McCann Public Service Assistant
Animal & Dairy Science
Recent Horse Publications from UGA Extension
Fences for Horses
(B 1192)
Fences are necessary to safely confine horses yet provide them with the opportunity to exercise and graze. Because of the natural flight response of horses, they tend to injure themselves in fences more than most other livestock. In addition, many horses are extremely valuable and that justifies the extra cost of building a fence that is safe, strong and attractive. When selecting a fence, consider all three of these important functions: utility (keeping the horses in), safety and aesthetics. How much importance is placed on each function depends on the owner's budget, the value of the animals and your priorities. A number of alternatives are available for consideration.
Forage Systems for Horses in Georgia
(B 1224)
A good pasture and forage program can provide quality feed and normally will be the most efficient and economical means of providing a substantial part of equine rations. In Georgia, we are fortunate to have a mild climate, soils suitable for producing forages and a good selection of highly productive forage species. With careful planning and good management, adequate grazing can be supplied for up to 10 months of the year in most areas of the state. To many producers, the term "horse pasture" denotes grazing management and forage crops unique to horses. This is not the case at all. Because the horse is a herbivore, most forage crops commonly used for cattle can also be used to provide grazing for horses.
A Review of Georgia's Animal Feeding Operation Regulations
(B 1257)
This document is intended to be an accurate outline of Georgia’s Animal Waste Regulations at the time of publication, and is not a comprehensive citation. The new regulations require changes in the way AFOs do business. The focus on management of nutrients can improve profitability by better use of nutrients produced on the farms and reduced need for fertilizer purchase. There may also be opportunities for composting and/or selling manures for off-farm uses. Although the new regulations require more record keeping, the records may help improve farm management and productivity. While these regulations may appear complex, they are designed to protect both the farmer and the environment. Compliance with these regulations will provide the farmer with documentation that they are making a conscientious reasonable effort to operate their farm in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
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