Horses

The University of Georgia’s Equine Extension Program encompasses both state youth horse programs as well as continuing education for horse owners and county Extension agents.  The mission of this program is to provide resources and support for youth education, county trainings and programming, and to serve as a knowledge base for questions and concerns of the industry.

Equine resources from UGA Extension


Equine Researcher

Kylee Jo Duberstein Associate Professor
Animal & Dairy Science

Extension Equine Specialist

KARI K. TURNER Associate Professor
Animal & Dairy Science

Equine Public Service Assistant

Julia S. McCann Public Service Assistant
Animal & Dairy Science
Recent Horse Publications from UGA Extension
Caring for the Older Horse: Common Problems and Solutions
(B 1368)
Horses have relatively long life spans compared to other livestock and companion animals, often living into their late 20s and early 30s. Many horses have productive careers into their 20s. In fact, in many disciplines, horses do not peak until their teenage years. Good nutrition, maintenance and veterinary care allow horses to lead longer and more productive lives. However, as horses age, their needs change and additional care may be required to keep them as healthy as possible. This publication addresses changes in the aging horse's body that impact its requirements, possible ways to meet these requirements, and solutions to problems that may occur.
Basic Nutritional Guidelines for Equine Management
(B 1356)
Providing proper and adequate nutrition is a challenge all horse owners must face. Understanding your horse’s nutritional needs is important, not only to optimize performance, but also to ensure your horse’s safety. The following guidelines emphasize key points to keep in mind when determining how to meet your horse’s nutritional requirements.
Fences for Horses
(B 1192)
Fences are necessary to safely confine horses yet provide them with the opportunity to exercise and graze. Because of the natural flight response of horses, they tend to injure themselves in fences more than most other livestock. In addition, many horses are extremely valuable and that justifies the extra cost of building a fence that is safe, strong and attractive. When selecting a fence, consider all three of these important functions: utility (keeping the horses in), safety and aesthetics. How much importance is placed on each function depends on the owner's budget, the value of the animals and your priorities. A number of alternatives are available for consideration.
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